Volume 5, Issue 4 (December 2015)

Global Dialogue

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Editorial: Interdisciplinarity and the Disciplines

This issue opens with two interviews. The first is with Frances Fox Piven, one of the most remarkable scholars in the history of US sociology. Her dedication to such issues as welfare rights, voter registration and most recently the Occupy Movement has informed her original analysis of social movements, calling attention to the power of […]

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The Power of Disruption: An Interview with Frances Fox Piven

Frances Fox Piven is an internationally renowned social scientist, and a much beloved teacher. She is a radical democrat and inspiring scholar-activist whose defense of the poor has dominated her remarkable and courageous career. Her first book, Regulating the Poor: The Functions of Social Welfare (1971), co-authored with Richard A. Cloward, ignited a scholarly debate […]

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The Appeal of the Islamic State – An Interview with François Burgat

François Burgat is a political sociologist and senior researcher at the French Centre national de la recherche scientifique (CNRS), who has devoted his career to the analysis of political systems and civil societies in the Arab world. He is one of those rare scholars capable of understanding the Islamic movements without romanticizing or vilifying them, […]

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The Strange History of Sociology and Anthropology

by Jan Breman, University of Amsterdam, Netherlands In the early twentieth century, the founding father of the social sciences in the Netherlands drew a line between sociology and anthropology. While anthropology would study the “less advanced” peoples, sociology would focus on the social organization of the “more advanced” societies – who all happened to be […]

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The Austrian Legacy of Public Sociology

by Rudolf Richter, University of Vienna, Austria and Chair of the Local Organizing Committee of the Third ISA Forum of Sociology, Vienna, 2016 The Third ISA Forum’s theme, formulated by the Forum President Markus Schulz, reads, “The Futures We Want: Global Sociology and Struggles for a Better World.” The Forum’s location is an apt setting […]

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The US and Cuba: Making Up Is Hard To Do

by Luis E. Rumbaut, Cuban American Alliance, Washington D.C., USA and Rubén G. Rumbaut, University of California, Irvine, USA In a thirteen-minute address last December, President Barack Obama dismissed as a failure 53 years of a policy designed to strangle Cuba’s economy. The United States – or, at least, its Executive Branch – was ready […]

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On Racism and Revolution: An Interview with Cuban Activist Norberto Mesa Carbonell

Since 1959, the Cuban revolution has been dedicated to racial equality. In a country where slavery was abolished only in 1886, the revolution offered many black Cubans their first access to land and education, through the new universal egalitarian policies, and an explicit commitment to eliminating racial discrimination. Even critical scholars argue that though it […]

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Sweeping News from Havana[1]

by Luisa Steur, University of Copenhagen, Denmark   December 17, 2014, the day Obama announces that the US and Cuba will restore full relations, is a memorable day in Havana. Juan, an ex-boxer turned street sweeper and muy fidelista (very loyal to Fidel), receives the news on the half-broken television he found in the trash one […]

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The Sunflower Movement and Taiwan’s Embattled Sociology

by Ming-sho Ho, National Taiwan University, Taiwan In protest against a sweeping trade liberalization agreement with China, Taiwan’s university students stormed the national legislature in the evening of March 18, 2014, unexpectedly giving rise to a 24-day occupation of parliament, and a subsequent political crisis. The so-called Sunflower Movement partly inspired and was often linked […]

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Which Comes First? Labor or Environmental Movement?

by Hwa-Jen Liu, National Taiwan University, Taiwan and Treasurer of ISA Research Committee on Labor Movements (RC44) On November 13, 1970, Korean textile worker Chun Tae-Il led a ten-man demonstration protesting dire working conditions, demanding “a nine-hour workday with four days off a month.” As the confrontation came to an end, Chun set himself on […]

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Compressed Parenthood in Taiwan

by Pei-Chia Lan, National Taiwan University, Taiwan and member of ISA Research Committees on Family (RC06) and Labor Movements (RC44) Taiwan’s fertility rate is now one of the lowest in the world. Raising their ever-more precious and vulnerable children, Taiwanese parents are constantly advised by expert opinions, often translated from the West, to attend to […]

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The Making of Collapse: Taiwan in the 21st Century

by Thung-hong Lin, Academia Sinica, Taiwan and member of ISA Research Committees on Social Stratification (RC28) and Sociology of Disasters (RC39) Taiwan has experienced great economic, political and social changes during the last three decades. However, most sociological literature on Taiwan still only focuses on its story of successful development. Conventional wisdom usually includes: a […]

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Generality and Particularity in Taiwanese Sociology

by Mau-kuei Chang, Academia Sinica, Taiwan, and member of the ISA Research Committee on Racism, Nationalism, and Ethnic Relations (RC05) A full account of the current status of sociology in Taiwan would be impossible; instead, I offer a few examples illustrating how sociologists “do sociology” in Taiwan. I begin with the most recent annual meeting […]

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Streetcorner Sociology

by Hong-Zen Wang, National Sun Yat-sen University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan and member of the ISA Research Committee on Migration (RC31) Disseminating professional knowledge in Taiwan’s current academic environment is not an easy job: university administrations do not encourage such “unproductive” work. Any social scientist who wants to engage in public affairs risks being stigmatized as “unacademic.” […]

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Jürgen Hartmann, a Dedicated Internationalist

by Lyudmila Nurse, Co-founder and Director of the Oxford XXI Think-Tank, UK and former Board Member of ISA Research Committee on Youth (RC 34) and Sylvia Trnka, former Board Member of RC34, Austria[1] Always cheerful and friendly, kind, open-minded, welcoming, positive, cooperative, helpful, warm-hearted, understanding, an internationally active scientist, a skillful organizer, an inspiring personality – […]

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