Volume 7, Issue 4

Global Dialogue

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Editorial: A Short History of Global Dialogue

Global Dialogue began in 2010 as an eight-page newsletter. It began in four languages – English, French, Spanish and Chinese – and was produced with a simple Microsoft program, involving the work of four people. Seven years later it has become a full-fledged magazine with four issues a year, each some 40 pages long, published […]

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Shaping The Great Transformation: A Conversation with Kari Polanyi Levitt

Karl Polanyi has become a canonical thinker in sociology and beyond. His book The Great Transformation, has become a classic that touches on almost every subfield of sociology. Its influence extends far beyond sociology to economics, political science, geography and anthropology. Being a critique of the market economy for the way it destroys the fabric […]

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Behind Trump’s Rhetoric of Economic Nationalism

by Peter Evans, University of California, Berkeley, USA and member of ISA Research Committees on Economy and Society (RC02), Futures Research (RC07), Labour Movements (RC44), Social Classes and Social Movements (RC47) and Historical Sociology (RC56) “Economic nationalism” has a venerable history. From Alexander Hamilton to Friedrich List, to their twentieth-century successors in Latin America, Africa […]

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Trumpism and the White Male Working Class

by Raka Ray, University of California, Berkeley, USA It has become commonplace in both media and scholarly writing to describe many of the people who voted for Trump, and who show up in large numbers for right-wing protests like that in Charlottesville, Virginia, as “angry white men.” The Washington Post asks, “Why are so many […]

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Immigration and Trump-Era Politics

by G. Cristina Mora, University of California, Berkeley, USA The run-up to November 2016 included much rhetoric about who made America great, and who would bring about its moral and economic downfall. At the center of this debate were immigrants: claims about “bad hombres” and “criminals” from Mexico and elsewhere peppered then-candidate Trump’s speeches and […]

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Trump’s Assault on Labor

by Ruth Milkman, City University of New York, USA and member of ISA Research Committee on Labour Movements (RC44) Obituaries for the US labor movement were a well-worn staple of left-wing political discourse long before Donald Trump’s unexpected ascension to the presidency. For decades now, both the unionized share of the workforce and the incidence […]

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American Brumaire?

by Dylan Riley, University of California, Berkeley, USA Does Trump’s victory mark a fundamental shift in US politics? Yes, but perhaps not in the way you might expect. Far from reflecting an incipient fascism, Trump’s presidency represents a tendency towards “neo-Bonapartism”: it substitutes a charismatic leader for a hegemonic project. Like the French nineteenth-century version, […]

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The Rise of the Leninist Right

by Cihan Tuğal, University of California, Berkeley, USA The victory of right-wing populism in America took half of the nation by surprise. If contextualized in a world-historical manner, however, it is far from shocking. In a nutshell, the boom-and-bust cycles of the neoliberal era have exhausted themselves. Economic crisis does not directly translate into a […]

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Democratic Distemper in Brazil and South Africa

by Gay W. Seidman, University of Wisconsin-Madison, USA and member of ISA Research Committee on Labour Movements (RC44) Since Trump’s unexpected electoral victory, much ink has been spilt on the challenges of globalization and the threat of authoritarian populism, but most of that discussion has focused on the wealthy countries of the global North. But […]

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Argentina under Scrutiny

by Juan Ignacio Piovani, National University of La Plata, Argentina, and member of ISA Research Committees on Futures Research (RC07) and Logic and Methodology (RC33) Not long after the Argentinian scientific community enthusiastically welcomed the newly established Ministry of Science and Technology, the Minister, a renowned chemist named Lino Barañao, granted his first in-depth interview. […]

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Mapping Argentina’s Social Sciences

by Fernanda Beigel, National University of Cuyo, Argentina, and member of ISA Research Committee on the History of Sociology (RC08) Over the past 40 years, the geography of science has been re-mapped, through a publication system which progressively established a “universal” language and writing style, and through a mainstream circuit which built prestige for a […]

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Social and Cultural Diversity in Argentina

by Alejandro Grimson, National University of San Martin, Argentina Every nation is more heterogeneous in socio-cultural matters than its self-image usually suggests, but Argentina is perhaps an extreme case. Most Argentinians believe that Brazil contains more indigenous people than Argentina does; but in fact, according to the 2010 National Census, whereas Brazil included 850,000 persons […]

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Social Inequality in Contemporary Argentina

by Agustín Salvia and Berenice Rubio, University of Buenos Aires, Argentina Most Latin American societies have been marked by underdevelopment and stark inequalities. In the mid-twentieth century, however, Argentinian society seemed to illustrate an alternative: high urbanization, full employment, universal healthcare and education, advanced intermediate industrialization and an extensive middle class – a relatively integrated […]

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Exploring Social Capital in Argentina

by Gabriel Kessler, National University of La Plata, Argentina, and member of ISA Research Committees on Futures Research (RC07), Social Stratification (RC28) and Social Psychology (RC42) What do Argentina’s micro-social relations look like? How do they vary within the country, and how does Argentina compare to other regions of the world? How are they influenced […]

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Ali Shariati, Forgotten Sociologist of Islam

Ali Shariati (1933–1977) is widely regarded as the Voltaire of Iran’s 1979 Revolution. He was born into a religious family, received his doctorate in 1963 from the Sorbonne’s Faculté des Lettres et Sciences Humaines, and died in England in 1977. In Paris, Shariati enthusiastically read western socio-political thought and philosophy and was highly influenced by […]

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Chinese Edition of Global Dialogue

Jing-Mao Ho joined Global Dialogue in 2010 when he was a research assistant to Dung-Sheng Chen, Distinguished Professor of Sociology at the National Taiwan University. Dr. Chen supervised the translation and editing work in the first few years (occasionally along with Mau-Kuei Chang, Research Fellow of Sociology at Academia Sinica, Taiwan). Jing-Mao Ho has greatly […]

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