Burawoy Michael

Global Dialogue began in 2010 as an eight-page newsletter. It began in four languages – English, French, Spanish and Chinese – and was produced with a simple Microsoft program, involving the work of four people. Seven years later it has become a full-fledged magazine with four issues a year, each some 40 pages long, published […]

Karl Polanyi has become a canonical thinker in sociology and beyond. His book The Great Transformation, has become a classic that touches on almost every subfield of sociology. Its influence extends far beyond sociology to economics, political science, geography and anthropology. Being a critique of the market economy for the way it destroys the fabric […]

As I reflect on my last ten years of engagement with the ISA, I am struck by the continuing influence of the national on the form and content of sociology. We do have an international sociology best represented in the ISA by the array of Research Committees, Thematic Groups and Working Groups. Yet, even these […]

Duterte, Erdogan, Orban, Putin, Le Pen, Modi, Zuma and Trump – they all seem to be cut from a similar nationalist, xenophobic, authoritarian cloth. The triumph of Trump has given new energy to illiberal movements and right-wing dictatorships. Undoubtedly, the political reaction has been in the making for decades as liberal democracies have propelled third-wave […]

For all our sophisticated survey research very few predicted the election of Donald Trump. This suggests US sociologists have a limited knowledge of their own country. While there are notable studies of right-wing movements – and we published one by Arlie Hochschild two issues ago (GD6.3) – they are vastly outnumbered by studies of leftist-oriented […]

This issue continues to look backwards and forwards, reflecting on the last six years of Global Dialogue, and the swing from effervescent social movements – Indignados, Occupy, Arab Spring, etc. – to movements of the right that have installed authoritarian regimes in Egypt, Turkey, Poland, Hungary, Philippines, Argentina, and Brazil. This global trend may be […]

Between 2011 and 2014 Global Dialogue reported optimistically on the social movements engulfing the world – Arab Uprisings, Occupy movements, Indignados, labor movements, student movements, environmental movements, and struggles against rural dispossession. The optimism was short-lived as these movements set in motion changes that have led to a wave of reactionary populist movements and authoritarian […]

The most innovative sociology often comes from the margins of academia and sometimes even from outside academia altogether. A case in point is W.E.B. Du Bois, probably the most significant US sociologist to have walked the planet. He is the subject of Aldon Morris’s new book, The Scholar Denied, featured in this issue. Morris shows […]

When scientists discuss climate change they do so with dire warnings of the catastrophic consequences of climbing temperatures of the earth’s atmosphere – the floods, the tycoons, the melting glaciers, and the wholesale destruction of the communities. When they have paid attention to the politics of climate change scientists have focused on climate change deniers […]

This issue opens with two interviews. The first is with Frances Fox Piven, one of the most remarkable scholars in the history of US sociology. Her dedication to such issues as welfare rights, voter registration and most recently the Occupy Movement has informed her original analysis of social movements, calling attention to the power of […]